THE WEEK

I love The Week - the magazine, that is. For many decades I’ve been a subscriber to news magazines. In fact when I was around eighteen my father the newspaper editor noticed me reading Time and was obviously relieved that his slightly scatterbrained daughter had finally developed an interest in what might be going on outside of East Liberty.

Eventually, along with Time, Newsweek began arriving in our mailbox. Very much like Time, it filled in the gaps, those stories perhaps not covered in Time, and it provided a slightly different slant on what I already knew.

Although I thought I was pretty hip to be reading Time and Newsweek, I became aware as the years went by that smart, sophisticated people, or those who imagine themselves to be so, read The New Yorker or The Atlantic or any of a number of other magazines geared more to the intellectual than to middle of the road readers like me.

Having been gifted, in recent years, with a subscription to The New Yorker, I would zip through each issue, from back to front – which, for reasons best figured out by a shrink, is the way I read most magazines – and occasionally hunker down to read an article about a subject that genuinely interested me. But my beef with The New Yorker is that the articles are too darned long. If I want to read a book, I’ll read a book. I know people who have actually stopped reading books in order to have time to read The New Yorker. Seems a trifle backwards to me.  

A couple of years ago my husband and I became aware of the news magazine The Week. At first it seemed a little flimsy. The articles are short, too short, surely, to contain much information. But the publishers assume that we already have a decent grip on what’s going on in the world. Their mission is to present assorted perspectives from publications around the country and the world, and from the left and the right, which I find refreshingly balanced.

In addition to news and opinion pieces, The Week always includes a two-page article about varied topics such as “Surviving Solitary Confinement” to “Where WWII Bombs Still Lie in Wait” to “English Is Not Normal.” (“It’s a wonder English ever caught on because it’s weirder than just about every other tongue.”) Not all of these articles interest me, but the people at The Week have gauged their readers’ interests.

Another feature, which initially gave me pause, is the pictorial “Best Properties on the Market,” houses around the country with unusual characteristics such as, “Homes with Columns” or “Houses in West Coast Wine Country.” “Homes for the Literary-minded” includes a six-bedroom stone house with large library located in Sewickley PA. Most of the homes are in the seven figure category, but there’s always a “Steal of the Week” that one of us might be able to afford. Scanning the photos I initially think, Is this news? Maybe not, but I have never found myself bypassing those pages.

A selection of cartoons culled from various U. S. newspapers nearly always includes one by the Post-Gazette’s Rob Rogers. That gives me a thrill, and I’m sure it gives Rob a thrill, too. Imagine being so well-regarded nationally.

Book, art, film and television reviews and recommendations are in the mix as well as travel, health and science, technology and business. All news magazines include such reviews, you say. Yes, they do, but somehow not in as appealing and concise a way as The Week does.

I download the magazine into my iPad, each Thursday evening, two days before the print edition arrives in the mail. And it’s a struggle not to talk about articles I’ve just read to my Luddite husband, a hard copy man for sure, which he won’t be reading for a few days.

The iPad version can be handily read in portrait or landscape format, unlike Time, which seems stubbornly to be locked into the portrait format.

In my back-to-front perusal it’s fun finally to arrive at the world and U. S. news where maps snap into view, each with a pushpin protruding from the relevant country highlighted in red.

And of course there’s a sprinkling of light fare – “Only in America,” “Good Week/Bad Week” and, in case you’ve given up completely a few nuggets titled “It Wasn’t All Bad,” anecdotes that give us hope.

In case you’re wondering why I’m telling you all of this it’s simply because we don’t know anyone else who subscribes to The Week, but we think many of you might enjoy it. If you are a subscriber, I’d be interested to know that. And if you’re not, give it a whirl.

Meanwhile, happy reading, whatever your periodical of choice happens to be.

 

I don’t get Brownie points, free subscriptions, or anything else for writing the foregoing. In case you’re interested, take yourself to http://theweek.com.

Posted on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 at 12:13PM by Registered CommenterPatricia P. Jennings | CommentsPost a Comment

ONLINE FUN

There are so many apps, games and online sources of information that I'm a little reluctant to mention two that on snowy, stay-at-home days, gobble up some of my hours in a most enjoyable way. You might know about both of them already, but I thought I'd mention them just in case you don't.

A couple of years ago I learned about a nifty language-learning web site, Duolingo, on which one can study any of more than fifty foreign languages free of charge, and even better, free of ads. Who needs to spend hundreds of dollars on Rosetta Stone or some other overpriced course?

At the very least Duolingo is entertaining. Its graphics are perky, and there is a clever assortment of exercises and games, accompanied by fanfares, bells and whistles, that can keep you occupied for hours. I’m working on French, and although I never expect to speak or write like a native, I know that the practice is good for my aging brain as I add new vocabulary each day and refresh what I learned in college.

Although I had been aware of Duolingo for a while, only recently did I learn that it was originated and is headquartered in Pittsburgh. Begun by Carnegie Mellon University professor Luis von Ahn and a group of young colleagues, Duolingo's goal is to provide “Free language education for the world.” To find out what languages are offered go to: https://www.duolingo.com/courses.

Another site, which came to my attention on a cold day in January, is Quora, a platform for questions and answers, which might sound snooze-inducing, but I find it fascinating. Anyone can register to ask and answer questions, although there are a few guidelines to follow having to do with the aptness of a response and, of course, standards of decency. Most participants are ordinary people, many from foreign countries. But answers have been posted by such heavyweights as Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz, Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales, British comedian-actor Stephen Fry and, last but not least, Barack Obama.

Quora states that its mission is to share and grow the world’s knowledge. “We want to connect the people who have knowledge to the people who need it.” A worthy goal, indeed.

Upon signing up Quora asks you to fill out a profile. I wrote that I live in Pittsburgh, am a Carnegie Mellon graduate, a musician, and that I like to cook and write. Somehow Quora knows how to direct appropriate questions to my page, although it hasn’t caught on yet that that I know absolutely nothing about engineering and robotics.

The first question I answered was, “Why is the Andy Warhol Museum located in Pittsburgh?” I simply typed in that Andy Warhol is a native Pittsburgher and that he attended Carnegie Mellon.

Many of the questioners, who are obviously not native English speakers, are curious about all kinds of things having to do with living in this country, speaking and writing in English, and topics regarding American dining and etiquette.  A visit to the site will leave you amazed, and sometimes amused, by some of the questions. For example:

  • What has been the worst generation in America so far? A respondent begins:Mine, the Baby Boomers. We are the smuggest, most entitled, laziest and most selfish generation since the Roaring Twenties, and probably before that...”

Another inquiry caught my eye because I’m a senior citizen and a veteran cruiser:

  • Is it really cheaper per day to stay on a Princess Cruise ship than live in a nursing home? The answer is yes. For the reasons why visit https://www.quora.com.

Some other questions and answers I found interesting:

  • Is it more correct to say “you and me” or “you and I”?
  • What is the intended purpose of philosophy?
  • What is it like to be raised by two people of the same sex?
  • For Italians what is the most annoying mistake Americans make with Italian food?

Someone wanted to know:

  • What are the worst decisions in U. S. history? This respondent began, “America’s transition from a drafted military force to a professional military force...”

And this one made me chuckle – and think:

  • What is a difference between the way Americans think about Europe compared to the way Europeans think about America? “Americans think 100 years is a long time. Europeans think 100 miles is a long distance.”

How true.

Meanwhile, I’m off to spend some time at Duolingo and Quora before it’s time to put dinner on the table.

Posted on Sunday, January 31, 2016 at 8:53PM by Registered CommenterPatricia P. Jennings | CommentsPost a Comment | References3 References

OBAMA

I watched Barack Obama deliver his last State of the Union speech with bittersweet pleasure. I will not live long enough to see another such handsome man, who is brown like me, stand before this assembly of our nation’s government bodies, to summarize the state of our union and lay out his hopes for our country. It isn’t all that it could be, but it remains leaps and bounds ahead of any other place on earth, no matter how venerable or exotic or grand.

What a man he is. What a husband and father. What an intelligent presence. And what character he must possess to have endured the bludgeoning he has received, the slings and arrows aimed at him while managing to retain his equilibrium, and his humor. The fact that he has not been assassinated – by bullet, by fire, or by noose – is a miracle. Say what you will about the Secret Service, they have obviously been doing something right.

How such a kind and good man could be so reviled by so many, so blamed for everything that’s wrong in the world is a never-ending source of amazement to me.

There is a website, Quora.com, on which readers ask questions about all kinds of topics, from the silly to the serious. “Who is the most interesting person you’ve ever sat next to on an airplane?”  “What is a food in your country that would be considered unacceptable in ours?” “After 7 years of having him, was Obama a good president overall?”

Many readers have weighed in on that question – some positive, some negative. I don’t usually pass along lengthy passages written by others, but I’m including the following, by a respondent named Barry Postma, because I found it refreshingly fair, and there seems to be a shortage of fairness these days. Feel free to agree with him or tear him limb from limb. Feel free to doubt that he is a Republican or even in his right mind. He writes:

“He has been a pretty good President. As a Republican, I consider him the best Democratic President since JFK.

“I was frightened by his inexperience in 2008, but he has led well. He's one of those people, like JFK, who use inexperience as an excuse to question old assumptions and try new approaches. It turned out to be a virtue.

“I feared that his peacenik, unrealistic anti-war rhetoric would abandon Afghans and Iraqis who were dependent on our protection. But the withdrawals were gradual and considered. Maybe ISIS would have been less successful if there had been a major, continual US presence in western Iraq or if the USA hadn't assisted rebels in Syria. But it's also possible that ISIS became inevitable in 2005 when Bush didn't hand the nation-building enterprise over to the UN and bring our troops home. What Obama really did was temper Bush's policy with a little restraint, which was about as wise an option as any available to him.

“I'm impressed with the agreement with Iran that prevents them from developing nuclear weapons while recruiting their cooperation against ISIS. (I'd rather give credit for that to Obama than Sec. Kerry because I just don't like Kerry. A personality conflict, I think.)

“I was an opponent of ACA (ObamaCare). Clearly, not everyone was able to keep their existing plan as promised, and the falling health care costs we expected haven't materialized. [The rate of increase of health care costs has shrunk, but more because of a lagging economy than because of ACA. So says
http://www.factcheck.org/2015/06...] I'm still unsure about it, and saving money in my personal finances by paying penalty taxes rather than buying health insurance. But what I dislike most is sudden change, and taking ACA away is the big change now. I concede to the status quo until evidence against it is overwhelming, which it is not against the ACA so far. Instead, the evidence is mostly neutral.

“On guns, I disagree with Obama's theory that regulating guns will have any effect on mass shootings, but I like what his 23 executive orders did (namely, put more cops in schools, enforce existing law better, promote gun research, and keep the background check system up to date). I disagree with Obama critics that claim he wants government to buy up all the ammo, intentionally botched the ATF's sting operation, or intends to take away everyone's guns. The rhetoric on both sides is silly, but the actions Obama has taken within the executive branch have been reasonable and moderate.

“Obama did the right thing focusing immigration resources on illegal immigrants who are not DREAMers. People who illegally immigrated as infants, toddlers, or young children didn't willfully break any laws, whereas grown adult border-crossers clearly did. That's the right place to put the focus.

“I also support the acceptance of Syrian refugees, which Obama and my Republican governor agree about.

“Obama's early speech to the moderate Muslims of the world was a fine idea, if overly idealistic and lacking in follow-though.

“Obama has kept about 45% of his campaign promises, and partially kept 25%. That's 70% that were at least partially accomplished. That's not bad at all!

http://www.politifact.com/truth-...

“Obama championed a few traditionally conservative ideas, like putting more cops in schools and strengthening border security. He's preferable to, say, Harry Reid or Nancy Pelosi in his willingness to work across the aisle.

“He seems like a decent guy and a strong family man, something I don't believe about Bill Clinton or Donald Trump.

“He's put up with the Birther and "He's a Muslim!" nonsense with poise and dignity, even humor. That kind of character is admirable and rare.

“Overall, I think he did remarkably well, for someone with whom I disagree about so very much. I'd happily shake his hand and thank him for his fine public service.”
 

Posted on Thursday, January 14, 2016 at 7:59AM by Registered CommenterPatricia P. Jennings | CommentsPost a Comment

THAT MOST EMBARRASSING MOMENT

Even those who would never deign to watch the Miss Universe pageant are probably aware that it made its biggest news ever this year. Call it a gaffe, a goof, or just a giant screw-up. Host Steve Harvey’s announcing the wrong contestant as Miss Universe takes its place as the biggest popular culture disaster of the twenty-first century – so far. The century is far too young not to assume that blunders unimaginable today will make Harvey's pale by comparison.

But for the moment he gets top honors, a dubious distinction to be sure. Whether it was the format of the card bearing the winners’ names or a teleprompter foul-up we’ll never know. What we do know is that Harvey had signed a multi-year contract to host the show, so he will be back, probably with an audience bigger than ever, an audience much needed by a show that has joined others of its ilk as moribund and anachronistic.

In the grand scheme of things, the Miss Universe pageant is pretty insignificant. But for the contestants and for Mr. Harvey on December 20, that might have been the most embarrassing thing that had ever happened to them, certainly for the young women. Imagine have a crown removed  from your head.

Steve Harvey has become the "Mr. Television" of this generation. You may not be aware of the pervasiveness of “Family Feud,” third most popular game show in history behind “Jeopardy!” and “Match Game." Currently hosted by Harvey, it can be found on some network at almost any time of the day or night. And in addition Harvey has a daytime talk show that airs at 3 p.m. opposite Dr. Phil. So it’s unlikely that he’ll be drifting into the sunset any time soon.

Veteran late-night talk radio host Jim Bohannon (KDKA) sometimes gets under my skin with his slightly radical views. But I have to hand it to him: he had nothing but sympathy and praise for Steve Harvey, calling him a consummate pro and predicting that this incident will not harm his career in the least.

Bohannon invited listeners to call in with stories of their own most embarrassing moments. Most of the stories were pretty lame, but there was one gentleman who, as an usher at a wedding, was tasked with pushing one of four buttons that would broadcast the sound of bells throughout the town. But instead of pushing the wedding button he accidentally pushed the one intended for funerals. I can hear it now: “Abide with me, fast falls the eventide” sailing over rooftops as the wedding party bursts forth from the church.

In light of Harvey’s blunder, I tried to think of an embarrassing experience in my own life. We tend to repress things that are too painful to recall. But I finally unearthed a memory of a situation that at the time made me want to run away – far away.

Lorin Maazel, while music director of the Pittsburgh Symphony, made an arrangement based on the music of Wagner titled “Ring Without Words.” The original score calls for wordless women’s voices to be heard above the orchestra. Perhaps to save money or aggravation, it was decided that sound of the women’s voices could be adequately produced by a synthesizer set up backstage, with me at the keyboard. When it came time for me to play, although the console lights were on, not one sound emanated from the speakers into the concert hall. All the audience heard were a few toots and tweets from the orchestra along with whatever lower sounds provided the accompaniment to the women’s voices. Who knows what Maazel and the orchestra thought as they helplessly soldiered on despite the absence of the “main attraction”? It was a surreal experience played out in front of thousands, not millions, but horrifying nonetheless.

As soon as it was over, I grabbed my coat and escaped the hall as fast as my little fat legs would carry me. My home phone rang a while later. It was, of all people, the stage door guard telling me that the plug to the speakers had been pulled out of the wall. Because I tend not to be paranoid, I assumed that this happened by accident, that it was not sabotage.

Before the next concert, Maestro Maazel came striding along the corridor heading towards the stage. I don’t remember exactly what he said to me, but I responded with a vehemence he probably wasn’t expecting, “That was NOT my fault.” He never said another word about it.

Is there any one of us who doesn’t have a story about in incident that made us want to dig a hole and climb in, something we did or something we said? We eventually recover and get on with our lives.  I survived my most embarrassing moment. Steve Harvey will, too.

Posted on Thursday, December 31, 2015 at 1:24PM by Registered CommenterPatricia P. Jennings | CommentsPost a Comment | References1 Reference

THE CULINARY DIVIDE

A couple of decades ago I wrote several restaurant reviews for the Pittsburgh City Paper, and as recently as 2007 a couple for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, while they were in the process of replacing their full-time reviewer. At the time I felt competent to share my impressions of restaurant cuisine and ambience. Not any more.

In the intervening years there has been an explosion of new restaurants around town that reflect so many changes in menu offerings that I often don’t even know what some of the foods are.

Because we Americans travel so much we’ve become used to eating a wide variety of foods that until recently we had never heard of. That has spurred the introduction of fusion cuisine, which combines heretofore unimagined combinations of flavors from far-flung corners of the globe. I’ll never forget how surprised I was when, a couple of decades ago, a restaurant in Bloomfield began serving Chinese food and sushi. Chinese food and Japanese food are very different, and I couldn’t have been more surprised if they had offered egg foo young along with a bowl of rigatoni with red sauce. That’s an exaggeration, but we have become quite accustomed to a mingling of cuisines.

My husband and I used to consider ourselves pretty hip about restaurant food, and we would rush out to try each new restaurant before the ink on their rental agreement was dry. But in recent years we’ve settled on a few favorite places where we feel comfortable with the menus and have a rough idea of what’s going to show up on our plates. We’re a little beyond surf ‘n turf and shrimp cocktail, but we aren’t quite ready for Squid Ink and Leek Ash Gnudi or Tuna Bloodline Bolognese. Both are probably delicious, but they sound peculiar to our old ears.

Against our better judgment, we recently tried a restaurant that was touted in a national news magazine. When a restaurant in Pittsburgh, a city usually ignored as a dining destination, is written up in a national news magazine it must be fantastic, right? To some it may be. To us it wasn’t.

Menu aside, this tiny place had a bare bones look about it, and the wooden benches of the booth in which we were seated were harder than a pew in a Quaker meeting house.

Secondly, I never appreciate being presented with flatware wrapped in a napkin, which, when unwrapped requires me to place the utensils on the bare table. Has the table been cleaned? Whose unwashed hands might recently have been on that table? Has it been sneezed on? I don’t place flatware on the bare table in my own kitchen. Why would I want to do so in a public place?

Is not being served bread a recent trend? It’s always nice to have something to nibble on if you’re having wine or a cocktail while awaiting your entrée. Maybe the amount of uneaten bread sent back to the kitchen is threatening these restaurants’ bottom line.  When we asked the waitress if they serve bread she answered, “Sometimes we serve bread,” in a tone that suggested she might bring us some if cajoled into doing so.  

Many items on the menu baffled us. From the list of Apps (appetizers) I ordered the Black Caviar Caesar just out of curiosity. Its ingredients, placed at a safe distance from each other on the plate, were described as, "Parmesan, baby kale, egg, white anchovy and focaccia." There was a small pile of Caesar-dressed kale. I wasn’t expecting a whole egg, but there it was, not hard-boiled or soft-boiled but something in between, prepared, I suspect,  sous vide – sealed in plastic and cooked for many hours at a low temperature. There was a scant teaspoon of black caviar topped with a tiny silver-skinned fish, a fresh anchovy, my first. It was an interesting mélange of ingredients, but for eleven dollars I doubt if I would order it again.

My husband, who is not a vegetarian, ordered the meatless meatloaf, which was singled out by the magazine. It was a dry-looking mixture of asparagus, cauliflower, farro and almond cheese. He ate it bravely but said little. Our dinner partners ordered the roasted chicken with chickpeas, pistachio, radicchio and pea harissa. They soldiered through it but their reaction was subdued. We all agreed that this was our first and last visit. This nouveau menu was a little too nouveau for us.

Obviously there is a chasm between my generation – our husbands still wear jackets out to dinner – and the young diners who arrive in jeans, lugging backpacks, who evidently savor these new culinary combinations and think nothing of dropping $100 for dinner in a place with no tablecloths that reminded me more than anything of the PX at summer camp in the Adirondacks in 1956.

A five-star customer review on TripAdvisor says, “This is our new favorite restaurant in Pittsburgh.” They loved the peanut butter torte with celery sorbet and “cannot wait to try the beet ice cream when it’s available.”

Not to worry. They can have ours.

 

Posted on Wednesday, October 7, 2015 at 11:52PM by Registered CommenterPatricia P. Jennings | CommentsPost a Comment | References1 Reference
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